Our last day!

It’s hard to believe that four weeks of learning, traveling and new experiences are over. But before we said goodbye, we had an inspirational class with New York Times Rome Bureau Chief Jason Horowitz. He has covered major political figures, from Trump to Obama in the U.S., and now is writing about the major changes…

The History of Sports

It’s not to hard to close your eyes, hear people cheering and screaming, smell food and imagine you are at a sporting event. Then you open them, and you’re standing in the middle of the Colosseum, a standing relic that begat all modern arenas. Suites, locker rooms, concession stands, winners/losers, teams, agents, trainers…all of it…

Italian Olympic Committee visit!

One of the most storied – and controversial – sites in Italian sporting history is the Foro Italico in Rome. It is the home to the Italian Open tennis tournament, AC Roma’s soccer stadium and the offices/training center of the Italian Olympic Committee. But it is also a standing edifice designed by fascist dictator Benito…

Meeting with sports journalists in Rome

One of the best parts of our class is getting to hear from speakers who are journalists with vast and varied experiences in the media world. We met with John Henderson, an Oregon native who worked for 40 years in major markets covering the MLB, college sports and features. He has now retired to Rome,…

The Vatican: experience the past, present and future

The Vatican, one of the most influential sites in the world, was our learning site today, as we took in its culture, history and legacy. We had a private tour of some of the significant galleries of the Museo Vaticani, then took in the intense frescos of the Sistine Chapel, ending our 2 hour tour…

Getting out of Rome…to the Lake!

This Study Abroad experience is about trying new things, seeing new places and constantly learning through all of our interactions. Saturday, we got up early to get out of Rome, and head north to the Castel Gandolfo and Lake Albano. The significance of the area dates back to the emperors, as a place to get…

Walking through Rome & 3x Olympian Maria Marconi

The best way to get to know Rome is simple: walk. We got our 10,000 steps (and more!) in today, on a perfect blue sky, summer day seeing the sights in Rome. We had a private guide showing us the significance of the architecture and art all around us, from the church on the corner…

Getting to know Rome…

The sun is shining, the air smells like jasmine, and…we are in ROME! We had our first day of class, getting the honor of Michigan State JRN alumna Suzette Hackney. She has been a trailblazer for women of color, as the first African-American female editor of The State News and now the director of opinion…

Last day in Paris!

We did a private guided tour of the Rodin Museum, learning about one of the most influential art figures in the modern movement. We dodged rain, still able to see Rodin’s famous works “The Gates of Hell”, “The Kiss”, and of course…”The Thinker”. The museum was curated by Rodin himself, putting his works where he…

Talking, learning, mentoring

Part of the goals for our Study Abroad is to meet successful journalists and people working in media. And they don’t all have to be in sports journalism. Hearing about their news organizations, their individual career and life paths, and how they see the world/future are important moments for all of us. We were lucky…

Experiencing the real

One of the most important parts of our Sports JRN class is experiencing our new world. France and Paris, are way more than the Eiffel Tower and the monuments. It is filled with real people, living their real lives. We spent on day on a 2 hour walking tour of the historic Montmartre quarter in…

CNN, L’Equipe – all in 1 day!

We interacted with two of the biggest media organizations in the world, through a meeting with CNN International’s senior correspondent Jim Bittermann in the morning, and then going to sports multimedia giant L’Equipe in the afternoon. Bittermann, a native of Illinois, has been based in Paris for decades, and tried to explain the French way…